Meals Interrupted. A photography project by Davide Luciano and Claudia Ficca.

Al Dente

I met Husband-and-wife Davide Luciano (photographer) and Claudia Ficca (food stylist) at an industry drink night last month, after following both of them for quite some time on Instagram. What a great pair! So thrilled to finally put faces to their great images.

Both of them recently teamed up to create Meals Interrupted, a photography series of dining tables abruptly disrupted by various events, namely, a bee swarm, a devastating fire, a full-blown cafeteria food fight, a calculated mobster hit, and a heavy rainfall. Each shot vividly captures the disappointment and sense of abandonment that evidently accompanies a gathering that is suddenly and unexpectedly ended.
The scenes were shot in both NYC and Montréal, the artists’ hometown. Luciano did all the photography and Ficca handled the food styling. The couple wanted to tell a story through food while challenging themselves to deal with unusual conditions:  “The idea of working directly with bees was very daunting at first, but once we were in the apiary and the bees were buzzing all around us, it turned out to be very soothing,” says Ficca.
“When Davide told me I had to burn all the props, I was shocked. This would be a first for me. I had no idea it would be so liberating!” says NYC-based prop stylist Maeve Sheridan, who was a key player on this project.
To see more of Davide’s photography work, Click here. To see Claudia’s food styling portfolio, click here, and to see more prop styling work from Maeve, click here.

4 Farmers Market Dinners, a snapshot. (France.)

asparagusrilletsDay 1: Brantôme. The goal is to visit a different farmers market in the Dordogne region of France, daily, and bring whatever I find back for dinner. No supplementing from supermarkets, I’ll eat only what I find at the open fresh farmers markets. So it’s Day 1 and I’m in Brantôme. I find dense White Asparagus from the Farmers Market nestled beneath the cathedral, as well as Cheeses, Butter, Saucisse, Rillets, fragrant Apples. Dinner is Asparagus steamed upright in a little salted water, then served with a soft poached egg.bwlaitpoulet The Brantôme Farmers Market is situated in the heart of the old town. This sign reads Goats Milk, Roasted Chicken._DSC9617My dear friend Lucie, who lives in Bourdeilles, comes for White Asparagus dinner. (No heat or hot water in the farmhouse but the gas stove works great!) I like the rustic-ness of making do with what I’ve found at the market. Nothing is pre-packaged or processed. It’s just plain, honest food.butcherperiguioxDay 2: Périgueux. I awake to freezing rain on the farmhouse roof. After Coffee and Marmalade on fried Baguette in fragrant Nut Oil, I head to Périgueux farmers market to find something to roast for dinner. I find a Chicken, some Potatoes. Then some fresh Strawberries, too. This picture is of a butcher in one of the indoor meat markets in Périgueux.chickenandpotatoesBack in the garden the rain has stopped and all is tranquil, except for the rustle of a robin red breast. I’m having a simple dinner of roasted Chicken in Garlic, Herbs… The Potatoes roasting in the chicken-y drippings… till crispy, and golden.. Later, there is Strawberries, Camembert. Lucie joins me again for dinner, her dog, Nusu, sits calmly with us but eyeing the chicken the whole while. markettruckDay 3: Bourdeilles. Bourdeilles market is very small with only a handful of vendors. It’s my closest market so I’m able to ride there on my bicycle. An old man drives his truck right up, opens the side window and from it sells everything one could need. I purchased Honey, Wild Onions, a large bunch of Radishes, and some fragrant yellow Apples with blotched, leathery skin. Now it’s back up to the farmhouse to make dinner.radishesverticalDinner is Radishes, sliced on Baguette, with French Butter and Sea Salt. Honey and Apples.leftoversDay 4: Leftovers Such a drab word for what is essentially a most unique and delicious dinner, but there is so much leftovers from the past 3 days that dinner on the 4th night has become a menagerie of past purchases. Plus a sturdy, old (the best kind!) Cookbook, to keep me company. Lucie and Nusu don’t make it over, and the night is quiet except for the plums falling softly from the trees that circle the farmhouse perimeter.

Can’t get enough of Grant Cornett.


Grant Cornett and I have collaborated on cookbooks and editorial shoots in the past, and it’s always great to work with him!

Here is some recent work I spied of his… These images appeared in The New Times Magazine, March 1st, 2015 in the Eat Column, by Francis Lam. The story was titled “More Than a Name. Learning to cook a Ghanaian Spinach Stew in the Bronx.” The pic above is of Ghanaian Spinach Stew with Sweet Plantains. Photos by Grant Cornett. Food stylist: Maggie Ruggiero. Prop Stylist: Theo Vamvounakis.

Montauk1 Montauk2 Montauk3 Montauk4 Montauk5 Montauk6 Montauk7 Montauk8 Montauk9 Montauk10 Montauk11

After a bitter-cold, snowy, season, every New Yorker I know is looking for Winter to come to an end, and soon! I was actually going to post this story on Saturday, but then it literally started snowing. Small, airy flakes started descending side-ways from the sky. So here, a story about the End of Winter. Hopefully this is our visual good luck charm for hustling Spring in, and sending old man Winter packing. Photographs by Christopher Testani. Styling by Carla Gonzalez-Hart. Shot on location in Montauk, NY.

Nose to Tail Eating

PigHeadDinnerAftermath ChicharronSalad Above: Chicharron, Radish, and Dandelion Green Salad paired with a Pinot Grigio JaysPigHeadDinner Above: Butter Beans with crushed Tomatoes and Roasted Pork Belly, Beef Bone Marrow with Sweet Cream Butter and Grilled Bread, and Roasted Pigs Head paired with a Beaujolais. JaysPigHeadRaw FriedSmeltAbove: Fried smelt with a Garlic Aioli.


I ran into the very lovely and inspiring food writer Melissa Clark last night and she graciously reminded me that I had not posted a single thing in about a year, and where had the blog gone? The answer is this: I’ve had an absolutely insane travel schedule and a thumping great workload which have put me on hiatus from keeping my blog up to date this past year, and it’s true, it’s been neglected and I’m truly sorry. But New Years’ resolutions aside (does anyone make those anymore? And besides… Eek, it’s March, so forget that idea!) I’ve resolved to keep my site up to date with food imagery, tips and cool food ideas and great talent that inspires me, on a much more regular basis. Let’s toast to that!

In that vein, here is a recent shoot from Photographer Justin Walker. It’s inspired by Fergus Henderson’s restaurant: St John, in London. Chef Jay Wolman, who works at Marlow and Sons & Diner, here in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, created a memorable Winter Feast celebrating Nose-(or head!) to-tail eating, that involved crispy pig skin, beans and wonderful bone marrow. Inspired from Fergus’ 2013 book, which is not entirely a new concept, but certainly a reminder of the continued importance of eating the whole animal, and looking for ways to wrestle with the ugly bits, to ultimately not waste a single piece.


Food: Chef Jay Wolman. Styling by Kaitlyn Du Ross. Photography: Justin Walker.

Follow them on Instagram:
Jay Wolman @the_white_bison
Justin Walker @behindthedawn
Kaitlyn Du Ross @babethebluebox

Justin Walker is a commercial and fine-art photographer based in Brooklyn, NY. He specializes in food, travel, and conceptual still-life photography. A native of Durango, Colorado, he grew up hunting, fishing, camping, snowboarding, and spending most of his waking hours outdoors. His childhood always involved a family adventure in the making; from commercial salmon and halibut fishing in Alaska to ranching in southwestern Colorado. The natural world is a foundation of inspiration in much of his work. He now splits his time in between Brooklyn, NY and the Catskill Mountains. With a background in graphic design, his photographic style encompasses a similar clean cut graphic aesthetic.


Want to see my most recent work? I now have a separate section devoted to just this. Click Here. Or on the page tab at the top marked ‘Recent Work.’